Posted 33 minutes ago

s-c-i-guy:

This song puts the boogie in my bones

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 2 days ago

polyphonyrocks:

vrac-musique:

Johnny Winter - Life Is Hard

"Life is hard and then you die.”

Posted 3 days ago
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kqedscience:

Calorie Counting Machine May Make Dieting Easier In The Future

Part of losing weight boils down to making tweaks to the simple equation of calories in versus calories out.

Americans spend over $60 billion a year on diet and weight loss products, according tomarket research, but the weight often comes right back. That may because it’s such a hassle to count calories — tracking everything you order or cook at home.

But recently, GE cell biologist Matt Webster told Morning Edition hosts Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne about a new calorie counting device that could make the job easier.”

Read more from NPR.

Posted 5 days ago
Posted 6 days ago

highwaygone:

“I don’t do drugs. I am drugs.”

Salvador Dali

(Source: hera11)

Posted 1 week ago

Word of the day: philosophunculist

oupacademic:

image

Posted 1 week ago

zelda-melodies:

Title Screen/Game Selection - Legend of Zelda:  Collector’s Edition

For protectoroftheseal

Posted 1 week ago

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.